What Should I do if I get Locked Out Of my House?

When you walk out the door and pull it closed, you get a great feeling of security when you hear that click. Unless you are on the outside of the door and your keys are still inside the house. That’s when your heart starts to beat harder, your brain begins to shake and you can’t remember if you left a candle burning.

We have all experienced being locked out of our own home and wondering how to get in. Unless you plan for such an event, you will have to make a choice to call someone and pay a large price or break something and pay a large repair bill. Either way, you have to get your keys and make a plan for the future if it happens again, and it will.

With the right information for the unprepared to preplanning, you can ease your mind and prevent brain shaking from future lockouts. Beginning to end, it’s all worth the extra cost. Always consider what your actions will cost in the way of money or medical bills before you make a move.

When you lock yourself out of the house the first thing to consider is your state of dress or undress. Sadly, some people take the chance of running outside naked just to find the two second thrill has become a misdemeanor crime of exposure. If you are one of these people, please don’t do this during the time kids are going to or returning home from school.

If you live in a neighborhood where the neighbors know you, then go ahead and proceed your break in. If you are new to the area or your neighbors haven’t had a lot of contact with you, call 911 first. This will prevent an unwanted arrest at gun point while trying to break into your own home without identification. If the police show up, be nice. Be very nice and explain your situation.

Most of the time with the right information regarding your identification, they will help. But as soon as the door is open you will have to produce your identification and prove residence. Hopefully, you won’t have any arrest warrant’s against you when they arrive. If so, you won’t have to worry about getting back in the house. One will be provided for you until you can make bail.

If you cannot find an unlocked window to climb through, you will have to make a choice. One, call a spouse from the neighbors phone to bring you a key. Two, call a locksmith to open the door for a charge. Three, break the glass on your least expensive window and climb through. Cost is always a consideration in any of these choices.

If you must break a window, use an object other than your hand. Make the smallest hole possible near the lock. Wrap your arm well with something to protect it in case of falling glass. Unlock the window quickly and open all the way. Be careful of broken glass as you crawl through.

Call a locksmith to open your door. There will be a charge and you will have to produce I.D. once the door is open. Also, you may need a credit or debit card for payment. Paying for this service is cheaper than a trip to the emergency room for deep cuts due to broken glass.

Hide an extra key outside. It can be under a rock, over the door frame, or other places easy to reach. Just remember, if you thought of it quickly, so will a burglar. Be creative. Use a key for the back door, not the front door. Hide it in a potted plant in the dirt, wrapped in plastic. Use a magnetic hide a key somewhere on your car, but not under the wheel wells. That is the first place a burglar will look.

Invest in a combination lock box to be installed somewhere on your property. Not near the door. Place it behind plants or under a porch area where it can not be seen. Use the combination to retrieve the extra key. This comes in handy for emergencies when you are on the outside and children are on the inside having too much fun.

For a sure thing, invest in a good locking system for one of your doors with an electronic lock. It identifies the user by a finger print. It can be set to any finger you choose, on any door and is a high security lock. They are strong and secure, but must be kept clean.

Never be locked out of your home again. Use common sense and make a good investment in the best lock and key combination for you.

Neil

Neil Wardlow has been writing professionally since 1989. Neil discovered he enjoyed writing when he suffered an injury during his 15-year building construction career. Neil now writes full-time, whenever he’s not occupied with entertaining family and friends, growing things, or making repairs in and around his beautiful ranch house.